Garlic

Garlic

Garlic is being used as both food and medicine in several cultures for thousands of years, dating way back to the days when the Egyptian pyramids were constructed. Apart from its culinary uses, garlic is widely used to help avoid heart diseases, including atherosclerosis or contraction of the arteries, a plaque buildup in the arteries that can obstruct the flow of blood and may lead to heart attack. We gather the best produce form all over the country and make the export of garlic form India possible, in the best way possible.Allium Sativum is the scientific botanical name of the plant. In the common language of India such as Assamese it is called as Naharu, in Hindi it is called Lahsun, in Bengali it is called Rahsun and so on. Garlic can be eaten uncooked or cooked. Small and large, wether uncooked or cooked, garlic comprises the necessary foundation for a lot of preparations, ranging from a meager cold condiment to a complicated hot sauce. A garlic clove can be used as a whole, severed into pieces, sliced thing or finely chopped.Garlic is cultivated in most parts of India, and the export of Garlic from India is mainly depended upon the growth in Gujrat, Madhy Pradesh, Orissa, Maharashtra, uttar Pradesh and Rajasthan. Garlic bulbs produced in heavy soils are deformed and during harvest, many bulbs are broken and bruised. Garlic crop grows under a wide range of climatic conditions. However, it cannot tolerate a climate that is too cold or too hot. It prefers medium temperature in summer as well as in winter. Extremely hot or long dry periods are not favourable to bulb formation. It is a frost-hardy plant requiring a cool and moist period during growth and a relatively dry period during bulb maturity. Garlic Bulbing formation takes place during long days and at high temperatures. An average temperature of 25-30°C is most helpful for bulb formation.